Making search a delightful experience in MoodleNet

MoodleNet is a new open social media platform for educators, focussed on professional development and open content. It is an integral part of the Moodle ecosystem and the wider landscape of Open Educational Resources (OERs). The purpose of this post is to explain how our approach to search will help with this.

Our research shows that educators discover resources in two key ways, which we’re bringing together with MoodleNet.

Proactive/Reactive

In order to be proactive and search for something specific, you have to know what you are looking for. That’s why it’s common for educators to also be reactive, discovering resources and other useful information as a result of their social and professional networks.

From its inception, we’ve designed MoodleNet as a place that works like the web. In other words, it harnesses the collective power of networks while at the same time allowing the intimacy of human relationships. However, search tends to be a transactional experience. How do we make it more ‘social’?

Seung (persona)At this point, let’s re-introduce Seung, the 26 year-old Learning Technologist from Australia who we first met in a white paper from early 2018. She’s looking to help her colleagues use Moodle more effectively, and to connect with other Learning Technologists to discover promising practices.

Seung comes across many potentially-useful resources on her travels around the web, which she curates using services such as Pocket, Evernote, and the ‘favourite/like’ functionality on social networks such as Twitter and Facebook. When Seung uses MoodleNet, she joins relevant communities, follows interesting collections and people, and ‘likes’ resources that either she or her colleagues could use.

One of the problems Seung has is re-discovering resources that she’s previously found. Although she considers herself an advanced user of search engines such as Google and DuckDuckGo, Seung is sometimes frustrated that it can take a while to unearth a resource that she had meant to come back to later.

MoodleNet search overview (Bryan Mathers)MoodleNet’s powerful search functionality will allow Seung to both find interesting communities, collections, and profiles, and quickly rediscover resources on MoodleNet that she has marked as potentially-useful. In addition, because MoodleNet is focused on open content, Seung can extend her search to OER repositories and the open web.

The same search functionality will be available through a Moodle Core plugin that allows any user, whether or not they have an account on MoodleNet, to search for resources they would like to pull into their Moodle course. This plugin will also automatically add metadata about the original source location, the MoodleNet collection of which it was part, as well as any licensing information.

We’ve already started conversations with Europeana and Creative Commons about allowing MoodleNet users to directly search the resources they both index. We would also like to explore relationships with other OER repositories who would welcome MoodleNet communities curating and using their openly-licensed resources.  

In closing, we should mention that we have big plans for tags across MoodleNet, involving both taxonomic and folksonomic tagging, and provided by both users and machine learning. More details on that soon.

For now, the MoodleNet team would be interested in any questions or suggestions you have about this approach to search. What do you think? What else would you like to see?


Illustrations CC BY-ND Bryan Mathers

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